Small Portland Catholic School Back to In-Person Sessions

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Credit: Cathedral School | 5th grade Cathedral School student

PORTLAND, Ore. — As more school districts across Oregon figure out plans to bring more kids into the classroom, there are some schools that have already brought students back for full-time in-person learning.

Many larger districts in the state have complicated decisions to make when it comes to how to safely offer limited in-person instruction for students.

But for some smaller schools, like Cathedral School in Northwest Portland, the transition has been a little easier.

“We are opening up, but it’s going to be far from business as usual,” said Amy Biggs. She’s the principal at Cathedral School, a private Catholic school serving kids in Pre-Kindergarten to eighth grade who are now in class for full-day, in-person learning.

“We have everyone here Pre-K through eighth grade that has chosen to come. We still have a distance learning option for our kids at home,” said Biggs.

She said 81% of the 260 students enrolled are choosing to attend in person.

In the fall, teachers taught kids online from their classrooms. The school soon brought back its youngest kids for limited in-person instruction. The majority of those kids were already participating in the school’s daycare program and were familiar with the school’s COVID-19 safety protocols, which made the transition to full in-person learning easier.

This week, middle school students joined younger students, coming back for full-day, in-person school.

Biggs said the size of the school along with the state’s revised guidelines and metrics have been crucial to reopening.

“Small schools like Cathedral School, 260 kids, 30 or fewer staff members, we can do things in a safe way because of our size and we don’t bus. We have one class at every grade, so it’s really appreciated because the revisions have helped us open up.”

Biggs said a number of safety measures are in place.

“We are using three different entrances to the building rather than one entrance […] we’re taking everyone’s temperatures. We’ve got contact tracing where we’re recording everyone who drops the kids off and who picks them up,” said Biggs.

They’ve also got shields on students’ desks, which they’ve tried to space apart.

“We have places where they’re not quite six feet, but I’ve got the 35 square feet in the whole room and then the distance between kids is maximum extent possible,” Biggs said. “We’re adhering to all ODE [Oregon Department of Education] standards.”

Biggs said right now in their middle school classrooms, there are between 21-25 kids in the room.

Students have to wear masks too, something Biggs initially thought might be an issue.

“Our kids that have been home are so excited to be back at school that all of our safety precautions, they are willing to do and they are really good at policing each other. It hasn’t been a problem at all. They’re used to wearing a mask. They’re used to hand sanitizer,” said Biggs.

The only time those masks come off is during lunch. Students stay at the same desk all day while teachers of different subjects rotate in and out.

For bathroom breaks, groups of kids go at designated times.

“Every hour one of my staff members is going through the bathrooms and spraying them all down with the electrostatic cleaning sprayer,” Biggs said.

Kids are grouped together into cohorts for recess as well.

Beth Sanchez has two children who attend Cathedral School, one in kindergarten and the other in sixth grade. She is excited her kids get to go back to in-person learning.

“We’re ecstatic really. We’re hoping that all the schools can get there. I think it’s so super important for kids to be in person,” said Sanchez.

She said while her sixth-grade son was doing well with online learning, she became concerned about the lack of socialization with peers.

“They need to have that interpersonal connection,” Sanchez said.

She said her son told her there were a lot of rules to follow. With this being his first week back, Sanchez said her son is figuring out what he can and can’t do.

She expressed confidence in the school and Biggs.

Biggs said before kids even came back, she asked parents to be partners and to talk to their kids about what to expect.

“Let them know ahead of time, you’re not going to get up and walk around the classroom,” said Biggs.

“I can’t have them all sitting on the top of the slide in a big pile like the eighth-grade girls love to do.”

She said she’s continuing to ask families to keep social distancing and wearing masks.

You can find the source article here.

How COVID-19 is Re-shaping Health Benefits in 2021

FamilyThe challenges of 2020 have sharpened our focus on health as never before. From the daunting COVID-19 pandemic to the destructive wildfire season, Oregon businesses and their employees have been tested in their capacity to thrive. Even before the pandemic, the health care experience could be overwhelming. Now it’s even harder to decide when and where to get care – while still managing costs. With the resurgence of COVID-19 and winter ahead, in-person care will be more challenging than ever. The impact of months of anxiety and isolation continues to make mental health an even greater concern. There’s no better time for a new solution to provide Oregonians tools and support to manage their health and well-being.

Simplifying health care’s complexity

The realities of our complex health care system have impacted so many employees and their families. It is particularly difficult for those who are responsible for managing the care of others, perhaps tending to the needs of an older family member or someone with a challenging health condition. There is considerable self-education required – learning about specific health issues, assessing treatment options and keeping track of prescriptions. It is common to need a variety of tools such as spreadsheets to track deductibles, copays and out-of-pocket costs and complex calendars for appointments with multiple providers.

Journi is a health care company based in Oregon that is making the total health care experience better. Journi brings together self-service tools, clinical expertise and human support to help manage a family’s health care needs – all in one place. In addition to digital tools, Journi Care Guides are ready to answer your health care questions and to help with everything from researching drug costs to scheduling appointments with the right provider for you.

“It’s why I chose to work for Journi,” says Coleen Carey, vice president of sales and marketing. “Journi relieves some of the hassle of managing our health care so I can focus more on my work and my family.” Carey adds, “I understand the realities of navigating a complex health care system as I manage care for my 14 year old daughter who experiences disability.” Like many, Carey is a part of the ‘sandwich generation,’ caring for both parent and child. “Journi helps me manage our health history, providers, medications and more in one place to keep things organized in a system that can seem overwhelming.”

Addressing health care access in a mobile-first world

A digital approach has become key to helping employees get the most from their health benefits, especially during the pandemic. They are accustomed to using apps to pay bills, deposit checks, and buy groceries right from their phones. In fact, they have readily embraced telehealth during the pandemic for doctor visits and mental and behavioral health support. It’s a trend expected to keep growing. In May 2020, McKinsey found that 76 percent of consumers say they will likely use telehealth going forward.

Available as a mobile app and connected to employer-sponsored health insurance, Journi provides convenient self-service tools and real-time access to clinical experts with concierge support that meets employees where they are in their health care needs continuum – all in a one-stop solution.

Making the human connection

Employees expect a digital experience to provide self-service convenience on-demand. Journi goes a step further, offering Care Guides who can connect the dots of health care. These support specialists can help with frustrating and often time-consuming tasks, such as finding in-network doctors and scheduling appointments or resolving questions about billing. If needed, they can also connect employees with a nurse or health coach via video, phone or email. It’s like having a personal health care assistant on call.

A healthier, more productive workforce in 2021

This year has taught us hard lessons: We’ve learned that health care innovation is no longer just “nice to have,” but critical to business success. And offering benefits for the whole person is the first step in meeting the day-to-day health needs of employees, families and communities. With comprehensive digital solutions like Journi, employees will be more engaged in their health care – boosting productivity and reducing costs for employers. And after the year we’ve had, that’s good news for all Oregonians.

The source of this article can be found here.

After a COVID Year, the Housing Market Continues to Favor the Seller

by Keely McCormick and KVAL.com Staff

LANE COUNTY, Ore. — Heading into the new year, the housing market continues to see low supply and high demand, and like many aspects of life in 2020, the coronavirus pandemic was a factor.

Inventory is extremely tight right now and is expected to stay that way throughout 2021. We spoke to one woman who just went through the home buying process, and she said she was lucky to find one.

“During the wildfires, the landlords decided to sell and they didn’t give us much time,” said Samora Walker, a recent home buyer.

Anya Samora Walker and her family had to find a home to buy in 6 short weeks, which is hard to do in this housing market.

“It’s been challenging, I have friends that have been looking for 2 years that haven’t found what fits there needs because houses are going thousands over the asking price,” Walker said.

And those prices will continue rising in the new year.

“It’s so competitive that you’ll get 5 to 10 offers on any given home and people just driving that price up,” said Robert Grand, the CEO of Grand Real Estate Investments.

Inventory initially dropped when the pandemic hit because people started to stay home rather than sell their homes, so when we’re used to seeing an influx of homes for sale in spring. 2020 didn’t have that.

This big new development is not a common site in Lane County. The reason for the high home prices is because of low inventory and limited land to build on.

“Here in Lane County and other parts of Oregon, there’s a lot of terrain and stuff like that so it’s not as easy to sprawl out,” said Grand.

But the demand for homes here is still high, as an influx of people are wanting to come live in Oregon.

Homes here are only on the market for an average of 33 days, but that depends on the home. Grand said an entry-level house priced around $350,000 may be on the market for only 4 to 5 days.

The median sale price for a home in Lane County increased 13.6 percent from 2019 to 2020. Grand said he’s expecting to see a similar trend in 2021.

Now the next big question is if we will see a lot of foreclosures because of the pandemic’s effect on the economy.

Even if we do see that happen, Grand said it would take a major influx to shift the housing market in the new year.

The source of the article can be found here.

Can ‘Vaccine Passports’ Be Required to Do Everyday Things?

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Syracuse breaks the on campus attendance record with 35,642 fans watching the Orange take on Duke at the Carrier Dome, Syracuse, NY, Saturday February 23, 2019. Scott Schild | sschild@syracuse.comScott Schild | sschild@syracuse.

Jumping on a plane to a far-away beach, cheering on your favorite team or going on a shopping spree might seem like the perfect antidote to a brutal year.

But be prepared to get vaccinated before you do any of those things – proof of a Covid-19 vaccine may be required to take part in many leisure activities next year.

Ticketmaster, for example, recently warned that event organizers might require a vaccination before buying a ticket (the ticket giant won’t require proof on its own). Airlines are creating a potential “digital Covid-19 vaccine passport” for travelers. Cruise operators are looking into that, too.

And that’s completely legal.

In essence, a private business can decide who to allow on private property, whether that be an airplane, a sports arena, or a mall. And there’s no legal protection for those who refuse to get vaccinated and want to patronize a private business. (That’s aside from government mandates, which are not addressed here.)

Just like businesses can make you wear a mask, they can also require you show proof of vaccination, said Stewart Schwab, a professor of law at Cornell University. It’s the same legal right businesses have, for example, to refuse service to someone without a shirt or shoes.

There are really only two exceptions to the rule: people with a documented medical condition that makes them unable to take a vaccine, and those with a sincere religious belief against vaccines, Schwab said.

In either case, the burden is on you to show why you are unable to take the vaccine, Schwab said.

Of course, just because it’s legal to require a vaccine doesn’t mean that businesses will.

Due to the nature of flying, proof of a vaccine might be required sooner than other activities, according to industry experts.

But it’s much harder to police a vaccine mandate at a mall or inside a big-box store, Schwab noted.

There’s talk of a vaccine passport or card that people can carry around as proof. But what if someone says they have a medical disability or a religious exemption?

Sorting out those types of headaches might be more trouble than it’s worth for most retailers, Schwab suggested. Businesses might be more willing – especially at the beginning of the vaccine roll-out – to continue their facemask and social-distancing mandates that have become commonplace to this point.

At the end of the day, though, a customer is there at the permission of a private business.

“You gotta wear a mask to come into a store,” Schwab noted. “I think that’s basically well-accepted. Once they can do that, what’s the difference with a vaccine?”

The Growth of Coffee Shops in Oregon

5fdcfca3eae89.image Coffee shops throughout Oregon provide customers with their daily coffee, lattes, cappuccinos, and other drinks that help wake them up in the morning and keep them awake throughout the day.

According to the National Coffee Association of the USA (NCA), which has tracked coffee consumption through annual surveys since 1950, 83% of Americans 18 years and older say they drink coffee and 64% drink it daily.

With such a large majority of Americans drinking coffee, it’s no surprise to find several coffee establishments in cities throughout the state, and sometimes multiple shops on the same block.

Coffee shops, however, provide customers with more than a latte or mocha. Coffee shops are places where people typically meet with a business partner or old friend, access public WiFi, listen to an open-mic session, study for an exam, or read a book. Thus, coffee establishments provide a gathering place and potential economic benefits greater than the price of a vanilla latte.

Growth through 2019, uncertainty ahead

Employment and wage data are classified according to the North American Industry Classification System, or NAICS, and coffee shops and stands are classified in the snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars industry. This industry includes other establishments serving items such as donuts, pretzels, ice cream, and frozen yogurt. In 2019, there were 1,575 establishments in this category with an annual average employment of 16,131.

About half of these establishments were located in the Portland metro area (i.e., Clackamas, Columbia, Multnomah, Washington, and Yamhill counties). While 2020 annual employment data is not yet available, the number of establishments dropped to an average 1,465 and employment dropped to 12,300 over of the months of April, May, and June 2020 as businesses struggled due to COVID-19 related business restrictions.

Though snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars is a small industry, comprising less than 1% of total statewide employment, it has seen consistent growth from 2010 through 2019. Growth in both the number of establishments and employment in the industry has outpaced the average rate of growth for all industries. From 2001 to 2019, the industry’s employment more than doubled in Oregon, whereas total employment for all industries increased by 22%. Similarly, the number of establishments increased by 118% compared with 56% for all industries. Growth at snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars has also outpaced the larger food services and drinking places industry. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has halted industry growth in this sector, with second quarter 2020 employment levels 24% below levels during the same period in 2019 at 12,300.

Despite social distancing-related limitations on where we can drink coffee, our appetite for the drink has not been curbed by the pandemic. According to the National Coffee Association of the USA, six out of 10 Americans are still drinking coffee daily. Where we are drinking, however, has changed slightly, with 20% fewer Americans drinking coffee away from home.

Oregonians not only love drinking coffee; we love roasting it too. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Oregon has the second highest number of coffee and tea manufacturing establishments in the nation after California and the second highest location quotient for average annual employment in the sector after Hawaii. Though some coffeehouses roast their own beans, there are several coffee roasters throughout the state from Portland down to Ashland, and east in Sisters, Bend, and Pendleton.

The coffee and tea manufacturing industry in the state steadily increased from nine business units employing 440 individuals in 2001 to 82 units employing 1,159 in 2019. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of coffee and tea manufacturing establishments dropped slightly to 80 in second quarter 2020. Employment in the sector dropped by 13% compared with second quarter 2019 to 1,002 jobs.

Workers and wages

The average annual wage for employees in the snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars industry in 2019 was $19,463, which was significantly lower than the statewide all-industry average of $55,019. It’s probably no surprise that workers in the industry earn lower wages as the pay scale for many jobs, such as baristas, often begins at minimum wage and many employees work part-time schedules. However, workers in the industry, especially younger workers, can obtain other benefits, specifically work experience. Compared with other industries, coffee shops tend to employ a larger share of younger workers.

Workforce age data for just the snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars industry is not available, but it is for the larger food services and drinking places sub-sector. In 2019, 14 to 24 year olds comprised approximately 30% of the food services and drinking places workforce compared with 11% for the total workforce. These younger workers in the industry can learn skills and gain valuable work experience that will allow them to be successful in other occupations. For instance, they can learn how to work in a fast-paced environment, receive payments, provide customer service, and acquire “soft” skills such as showing up to work on time, working in a team, and communicating with customers.

Working in the manufacturing side of the coffee industry may provide a much higher wage than working at a coffee shop. The average annual pay in the coffee and tea manufacturing industry in 2019 was $45,205, which is more than twice than the average for coffee shops, but lower than the all-industry average of $55,019.

Summary

Coffee shops, as well as coffee roasters, are small but have grown steadily through 2019. Despite COVID-19-related losses in 2020, employment in these sectors is likely to bounce back once social-distancing-related measures are lifted and coffee shops once again offer an atmosphere conducive to meeting with co-workers, business partners, or friends.

Sarah Cunningham is an economist with the Oregon Employment Department. She may be reached at 503-871-0046.

Top 20 Most-Viewed Oregon Homes for Sale

In past years, the most viewed Oregon homes for sale online were over the top. In 2020, that changed, along with everything else.

This year, as people faced a pandemic health crisis, economic insecurity and a need for more space to be used as a home office, gym and virtual classroom, home shoppers got serious.

They searched for a well-priced home in the right location instead of spending time eyeing fantasy dwellings – although the fabled Blackberry Castle, famous for being for sale since 2015, is finally in escrow.

Popular online searches ranged from a midcentury modern in Portland’s Bridlemile neighborhood, which is listed at $2,195,000, to a 1950 Mount Hood cabin in Government Camp, which sold Dec. 3 for $245,000.

The listing history of each property reflects the Portland-area market: The number of homes for sale has dipped to the lowest level ever as prices spike in bidding wars.

Some buyers, not wanting to miss an opportunity for rock-bottom mortgage interest rates in the 2.7% range while facing a market with little inventory are offering full asking price or more. For that, they expect most of the repairs found during an inspection to be paid for by the seller, say real estate agents.

If repair negotiations don’t please the buyer, there could be a “sale fail,” in which the buyer backs out, and the property bounces back on the market.

We asked the researchers at the Zillow real estate marketplace to single out Oregon homes that have received high views online.

There’s a floating house, where the owner will lend to the buyer, and a Victorian-era home, but the most popular residential properties viewed on Zillow in the last month have been properties that a location scout would pick to represent a traditional home.

Here’s the list of the top 20 most-viewed Oregon homes for sale:

1912 remade Craftsman in Portland Heights: 2909 S.W. Upper Dr. is listed at $450,000.

The Craftsman sits on one acre and was remodeled into a contemporary-style house with banks of windows. Inside, there are English oak hardwood and bluestone tile floors, a floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace in the vaulted great room, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 1,824 square feet of living space.

“Slab quartz counters, walnut cabinetry, Jeld-Wen windows,” says listing agent Lorna Murray of RE/MAX Equity Group.

Annual property taxes: $7,922

Market history: The property was listed for sale on Sept. 20, 2019 for $699,900, according to public records. The price dropped $200,900 about a month later, on Oct. 15, 2019, to $499,000. An offer was accepted on March 30, 2020, then the property was put back on the market on April 6, 2020. The house was pending again on May 11, 2020, then it was relisted again on May 24, 2020. When it was listed again on Sept. 16, 2020, the price was lowered $49,000 to $450,000.

Since being listed on Zillow 455 days ago, the listing has received 39,429 views and 2,040 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97201 zip code

Northwest contemporary in Portland’s Multnomah Village: 8476 S.W. 37th Ave. is listed at $684,999.

The house was built in 1924 on an 8,712-square-foot, secluded corner lot three blocks from village amenities. Inside, there is a gas fireplace, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 2,174 square feet of living space. There is also a large deck and basement space.

“This rare-design home is flooded with natural light from oversized windows. Corner lot has the possibility for future development and/or ADU (buyer to do due diligence),” says listing agent Taylor Rhodes of Uptown Properties.

Annual property taxes: $7,044

Market history: The house sold in February 2017 for $350,000, according to public records. It was put on the market Nov. 12, 2020 at $684,999. An offer was accepted on Dec. 13, 2020 and the sale is pending.

Since being listed on Zillow 36 days ago, the listing has received 21,302 views and 1,309 saves.

See more listings in the 97219 zip code

1956 contemporary house in Salem: 4670 Croisan Creek Road South is listed at $360,000.

The single-level house, built on one acre, has floor-to-ceiling windows in the dining and step-down living room. There is a sliding glass door that opens to the wraparound deck from each of the three bedrooms. There are two bathrooms and 1,782 square feet of living space.

The property has a year-round creek and an abundance of wildlife.

“Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired architecture on a private oasis, three minutes to Sprague,” says listing agent Colleen Benson of Keller Williams Capital City.

Annual property taxes: $2,976

Market history: The property was listed for sale Nov. 20, 2020 and an offer was accepted five days later, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 79 days ago, the listing has received 18,866 views and 1,342 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97302 zip code

2002 Craftsman-inspired in Bend: 55911 Black Duck Road is listed at $374,900.

The single-level house on 0.48 acres has upgraded laminate wood flooring and an open great room with large windows and a vaulted ceiling. The kitchen has stainless-steel appliances and tile floors. There are three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 1,321 square feet of living space.

The deck overlooks a fenced backyard with a fire pit and there is space for RV parking and storage.

“Light and bright home perfect for entertaining. Conveniently located close to Sunriver and just minutes to Oregon Water Wonderland river access,” says listing agent Christine Browning with Amy Moser of Red Door Realty.

Annual property taxes: $2,115

Homeowners association fees: $125 a month

Market history: The property was listed for sale March 16, 2020 and the listing expired. It was listed again Nov. 9, 2020 at $374,900 and an offer was accepted six days later, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 39 days ago, the listing has received 21,701 views and 685 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97707 zip code

Bayview house in Gleneden Beach: 33 Marine Lane is listed at $160,000 for a 25% share to four owners agreeing to use the home not as a rental and occupants to adhere to the nonsmoking requirement.

The 0.41-acre property is in a secluded location on Siletz Bay, next to a boat launch and a small beach with ocean access across the road.

The house was built in 1971 and has views from every window and the wraparound deck. There are three bedrooms, two remodeled bathrooms and 1,560 square feet of living space.

The private gated community includes golf links and a pool.

“Management agreement among owners to schedule vacation time,” says listing agent Yussetty Spicer of Spicer & Associates Realty.

Homeowners association fees: $225 a month

Annual property taxes: $5,424

Market history: The property was listed for sale Nov. 25 2009 for $499,000. Quarter shares were listed Oct. 3, 2020, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 76 days ago, the listing has received 24,525 views and 941 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97388 zip code

1910 bungalow in Portland’s Roseway neighborhood: 3405 N.E. 73rd Ave. is listed at $384,900.

The house, built on a 4,791-square-foot lot one block from popular Northeast Fremont Street, has refinished hardwood floors, a fireplace, two bedrooms plus a den/office, finished loft area, two bathrooms and 1,875 square feet of living space.

The unfinished basement has a laundry area, workbench and access to the backyard with garden beds, a water feature and patio. The detached one-car garage has storage space.

“House has newer roof. Close to shops and dining and easy freeway and public transportation access,” says listing agent Nicholas Swann of Windermere Realty Trust.

Annual property taxes: $4,208

Market history: The property was listed Dec. 3, 2020 at $384,900 and was pending three days later, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 15 days ago, the listing has received 8,197 views and 834 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97213 zip code

1912 cottage in Portland Heights: 3133 S.W. Upper Dr. is listed at $675,000.

The updated cottage on 0.74 acres has three bedrooms, three bathrooms and 2,600 square feet of living space. Outside are two decks, a quiet patio space and a detached garage.

“Tastefully updated in every way, with an open kitchen and soaring vaulted ceilings,” says listing agent Krystin Bassist of Windermere Realty Trust.

Annual property taxes: $11,212

Market history: The property was listed Aug. 17, 2020 at $700,000 and the price dropped $25,000 to $675,000 on Sept. 15, 2020, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 123 days ago, the listing has received 10,402 views and 705 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97201 zip code

Floating house in Hayden Island: 11606 N. Island Cove Lane, located in the back of the moorage with beach access, is listed at $225,000.

The renovated main house, built in 1979, has two bedrooms and two bathrooms. The tender unit, a separate titled home, has a living room, galley kitchen, one bedroom and one bathroom. The total is 1,620 square feet of living space.

”Great fishing off the back deck of the guest house. One of the best sturgeon holes is located 20 feet to the left of the back deck. Great for an investor or a family that wants to live in one spot and rent out the other,” says the owner (503-913-0835) who has listed the property and will carry a loan at a 5.9% rate for eight years with a $60,000 down payment.

Homeowner association fees: $1,064 a month

Market history: The property was listed Nov. 11, 2020 at $250,000. The price dropped $25,000 to $225,000 on Dec. 2, 2020, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 37 days ago, the listing has received 24,990 views and 748 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97217 zip code

1925 remodeled house in Oregon City: 14824 S. Redland Road is listed at $524,900.

The ranch-style house has a living room with a pellet stove and bay window, an updated kitchen with stainless-steel appliances, stone counters and an eating bar plus three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 2,184 square feet of living space.

The 4.19-acre property has territorial views, RV parking, creeks and room for horses. Outbuildings include a tack room, tool shed and carport.

“Master bedroom features an updated bathroom with a jetted tub. Look no further, this property has it all,” says listing agent Jimmy Bacon of eXp Realty.

Annual property taxes: $3,684

Market history: The property was listed Nov. 21, 2020 at $550,000. The priced dropped to $539,900 on Dec. 12, 2020 and $524,900 on Dec. 18, 2020, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 44 days ago, the listing has received 13,914 views and 753 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97045 zip code

1964 house in the South Portland neighborhood: 7006 S.W. Brier Place is listed at $565,000.

The midcentury house, on a 6,534-square-foot lot, has a living room and kitchen with vaulted ceilings, three bedrooms, plus an office (or fourth bedroom conversion), two bathrooms and 2,340 square feet of living space.

The new second floor deck has unobstructed views of the Willamette River and Cascades.

“Income potential with flexibility to rent garden-level as separate unit with a kitchenette,” says listing agent Michael Engeholm of Redwood Realty.

Annual property taxes: $8,065

Market history: The property was listed Sept. 7, 2020 at $659,500, according to public records. The price dropped on Sept. 21, 2020 to $599,000. The priced dropped again Nov. 16, 2020 to $565,000 and an offer was accepted four days later.

Since being listed on Zillow 102 days ago, the listing has received 8,310 views and 581 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97219 zip code

1955 bungalow in Portland’s Woodstock neighborhood: 5821 S.E. 49th Ave is listed at $350,000.

The house, built on a 4,791-square-foot lot, has the original hardwood floors, dual living rooms with two fireplaces, two bedrooms plus one noncompliant bedroom, two bathrooms and 1,736 square feet of living space.

There is a attached single-car garage and a fenced backyard with a wood deck.

“Fixer in the heart of Woodstock. This home is priced to sell. Come make this your dream home,” says listing agent Nycole Peraza-LaFave of Keller Williams Premier Partners.

Annual property taxes: $3,886

Market history: The property was listed Nov. 19, 2020 at $350,000 and went pending three days later, according to public records. The listing was removed Dec. 8, according to Zillow.

See more homes for sale in the 97206 zip code

1894 Queen Anne in Portland’s Buckman neighborhood: 203 S.E. 15th Ave. is listed at $715,000.

The remodeled Victorian-era house, built on a 4,791-square-foot lot, has high ceilings, refinished hardwood floors, an office or den on the main level, five bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms and 3,369 square feet of living space.

The basement with a separate fenced entrance has a kitchen and full bathroom, and was rented for $1,200 a month. The level backyard is fenced.

“Remodeled kitchen with storage galore. Super walk core! Don’t miss this one,” says listing agent Tatiana Xenelis of eXp Realty.

Annual property taxes: $9,381

Market history: The property was listed March 13, 2020 at $750,000 and the listing was removed March 25, 2020, according to public records. On Sept. 10, 2020, the property was listed at $725,000 and the listing was removed Oct. 1, 2020. On Nov. 13, 2020, the property was listed again, this time at $749,000 but the price dropped on Nov. 30, 2020 to $734,000. On Dec. 16, 2020, the price dropped to $715,000.

Since being re-listed on Zillow 35 days ago, the home has received 13,036 views and 562 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97214 zip code

Tudor-revival style house in Portland’s Cully neighborhood: 5120 N.E. 60th Ave. is listed at $300,000.

The house, built on a 7,840-square-foot lot, has hardwood floors, three bedrooms, a den/office, one bathroom and 1,680 square feet of living space.

There is a detached garage and a covered breezeway that leads to the fully fenced yard.

“Adorable and cozy home … spacious and filled with light, lots of potential,” says listing agent Rachel Aron of Resettle Realty.

Annual property taxes: $3,641

Market history: The property was listed Oct. 29, 2020 at $300,000 and an offer was accepted Nov. 4, 2020, according to public records. The house was back on the market Nov. 17, 2020 at $300,000, and was listed as pending on Dec. 5, 2020.

Since being listed on Zillow 50 days ago, the listing has received 12,089 views and 613 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97218 zip code

1987 Northwest contemporary house in Portland’s Southwest Hills: 1919 S.W. Montgomery Place sold Dec. 15, 2020 for $950,000.

The updated house, built on 0.4 acres, has three bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms and 2,160 square feet of living space.

“Prepare to fall in love. Privacy, design and details come together that make this the area’s hottest property in the most exclusive neighborhood. Modern, open concept living that will allow you to entertain and live with ease while being minutes from all PDX has to offer,” says listing agent Jason Mendell with Braden Fridell of Cascade Sothebys International Realty.

Annual property taxes: $11,680

Market history: The property sold June 3, 2019 for $341,000. It was listed Nov. 10, 2020 for $899,950, according to public records. It was pending six days later and sold Dec. 15, 2020 for $950,000.

See more homes for sale in the 97201 zip code

Midcentury modern in Portland’s Bridlemile neighborhood: 6109 S.W. Thomas St. is listed at $2,195,000.

The 1957 house has 18-foot-tall ceilings in the main living area and glass doors that open to a covered back porch. There are five bedrooms (one is part of an accessory dwelling unit), three full bathrooms, two powder rooms and 3,810 square feet of living space.

“This home is so special we had to name it: Cedar Grove is situated on 1.1 private acres. Designed to bring the outside in. Full custom design and finish,” says listing agent Jennifer Bolen of Premiere Property Group.

Annual property taxes: $9,829

Market history: The property sold Oct. 18, 2019 for $675,000. It was listed Sept. 1, 2020, for $2,195,000, according to public records. It went pending 15 days later, but was re-listed Sept. 24, 2020.

Since being listed on Zillow 108 days ago, the listing has received 10,563 views and 628 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97221 zip code

1950 Mount Hood cabin in Government Camp: 79693 E. Road 35 #157 sold Dec. 3, 2020 for $245,000.

The two-level cabin has a knotty pine interior, wood-burning insert and a living and dining area that opens to a deck with a view of the Zigzag River. Upstairs are four bedrooms spaces, one bathroom and 780 square feet of living space.

“One-of-a-kind, fully furnished just for you,” says listing agent Marti Bowne of Keller Williams PDX Central.

Annual property taxes: $1,091

Homeowners association fee: $2,681 a year

Market history: The property was listed Nov. 10, 2020 for $229,000 and it went pending six days later, according to public records.

See more homes for sale in the 97028 zip code

1954 rebuilt farmhouse in St. Helens: 58363 Old Portland Road is listed at $350,000.

The two-level house, built on 1.8 acres that includes McNulty Creek, has three bedrooms, upstairs bonus room, two bathrooms and 3,338 square feet of living space. The basement is set up as a multi-generational living space.

The property has fruit trees, a shed and room to park an RV.

“Privacy and serenity in a convenient location make this a unique opportunity. Come see all the potential here,” says listing agent Erica Sherlock of RE/MAX Powerpros.

Annual property taxes: $4,477

Market history: The property was listed June 26, 2020, for $399,000, according to public records. It went pending July 20, 2020, then was delisted July 31, 2020, then went pending again Sept. 8, 2020, then re-listed Nov. 11, 2020, then the price changed Nov. 11, 2020 to $350,000.

Since being listed on Zillow 176 days ago, the listing has received 10,648 views and 606 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97051 zip code

1955 traditional house in Eugene: 28246 Spencer Creek Road is listed at $499,000.

The house, built on 6.98 acres, has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and 2,100 square feet of living space.

The fully, deer-fenced and gated property includes southern exposure, fruit trees, water rights and outbuildings with a 20-foot-by-22-foot barn, chicken coop, garden shed, pump house and dog runs.

There is a seasonal pond, tree swing and organic soils.

“Beautiful lavender farm right outside of town. Don’t miss this dreamy opportunity,” says listing agent Freeman Corbin of Hybrid Real Estate.

Annual property taxes: $2,695

Market history: The property was listed Dec. 4 ,2020 at $499,000 and it went pending four days later, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 14 days ago, the listing has received 4,238 views and 237 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97405 zip code

1925 bungalow in Portland’s St. Johns neighborhood: 10015 N. Smith St., one block to Pier Park, is listed at $389,900.

The house, built on a 5,227-square-foot lot, has a wraparound sun porch, living room with built-in bookcases, a wood-burning fireplace, two bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms and 2,002 square feet of living space.

The master bedroom has built-in cabinets and French doors that open to a deck with a large porch swing.

Mature landscaping includes a garden space. A detached garage can be used as a studio.

“Sweet kitchen has a marble breakfast bar. Nearly full unfinished basement has so much potential,” says listing agent Nikki del Giudice of Farrell Realty & Property Management.

Annual property taxes: $3,294

Market history: The property was listed Nov. 11, 2020 at $389,900 and an offer was accepted five days later, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 37 days ago, the listing has received 628 views and 11 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97203 zip code

1969 Northwest contemporary in Portland Heights: 3042 S.W. Nottingham Dr. is listed at $850,000.

The modern house, built on 0.37 acres on a cul-de-sac, has an open floor plan with hardwood floors and vaulted ceilings, a master suite with a fireplace, two more bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms and 2,895 square feet of living space.

The kitchen has high-end appliances, a concrete island and custom beverage center.

There is outdoor entertaining on three levels.

“With an abundance of windows backing to natural green space, this home exudes peace and tranquility,” says listing agent Jennifer Turner of Lovejoy Real Estate.

Annual property taxes: $11,773

Market history: The property was listed Nov. 4, 2020 for $875,000 and the price dropped to $865,000 on Nov. 14. The price dropped again on Dec. 1, 2020 to $850,000, according to public records.

Since being listed on Zillow 79 days ago, the listing has received 9,159 views and 569 saves.

See more homes for sale in the 97201 zip code

— Janet Eastman | 503-294-4072

jeastman@oregonian.com @janeteastman

How Will Oregonians Be Different When the Coronavirus Pandemic is Over?

The end is in sight. The end of the year, the end of the winter, the end of the pandemic. It’s in sight, but not here yet — and things could certainly get worse before they get better.

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The impact the pandemic has had on businesses has been catastrophic, with joblessness at rates not seen since the Great Depression. Restaurants are taking a significant hit, though some are offering take-out, including Thai Bloom on Northwest 23rd Avenue. April 8, 2020 Beth Nakamura/Staff

 By the time we are out from under the coronavirus, we will probably have been dealing with its impacts for more than a year. Already it seems like it’s been forever. And we are not the same people who rang in the new year on Jan. 1, 2020.

This year, I became a different person — a more cautious and judgmental person, a more sentimental mother, a more involved daughter, and a much more accomplished baker.

In November, I asked readers to tell me how they have changed. Many people responded. Here are just some of their stories. These submissions have been edited for length and clarity.

— Lizzy Acker

“It’s made me more observant. With less cars and people about, there’s more stillness. I now notice different species of birds.” – Nathan Corliss, 36, Portland

“As a Vietnamese American, the pandemic changed the way I viewed my place in this country. I went from feeling fairly safe in this city to feeling insecure about how others will perceive me and my family when we are in public. This pandemic opened my eyes to the fragility of my rights as a minority and that l was so naive about my assumption that others see me as equal even though I live in a city lacking in diversity. A month into the pandemic, on a bike ride with my 4-year-old daughter, a white woman jogging in the park yelled racial slurs at us while we biked past her (keeping more than 6 feet away). When we stopped for a snack, a white man walked very close to us and started coughing. Another man yelled that we are going to die as I biked home through our neighborhood. After these incidents, I didn’t leave our house for months unless it was for groceries. I am much more careful when I take my kids out for walks now, and I avoid making eye contact and cross the streets to avoid people. I’m not sure I will feel completely safe again.” – Michele Hoang, 37, Portland

“My entire life I have been outgoing; always in trouble for talking in class, the storyteller at parties, the one that enters a room of strangers and leaves with a room of friends. Not anymore. I don’t know if it’s being out of the social habit or a victim of cabin fever, but I find myself turning into a recluse. And I’m angry. Angry at people I see going to Hawaii, Disney, or wine tasting — galavanting like the world isn’t a horror show. When I do go to the store, people are rude, impatient and generally unkind. I get it, going out is like walking the plank, but what happened to common decency?” – Chris Geraci, 54, Ridgefield, Wash.

“I am amazed at my own capacity for experiencing such a range of emotions, and how many emotions I have throughout any given day. Without this pandemic, I’d never have the chance to know my son so authentically and see him grow and develop an understanding of the world he lives in.” – Kelly Decklar, 40, Portland

“I already know that when I get to be older, if anyone asks me about this pandemic, I will refuse to talk about it. It ruined half my junior year of high school, and now my entire senior year. It killed some friendships that I had. I honestly cannot remember what normal life is like. And I don’t know what I will be like when I am with people again. Will I still be who I was before? Or will I be more subdued, and more quiet? I ponder about that often, because I truly don’t know.” – Michael Steinberg, 18, Beaverton

“For me, the pandemic has boiled everything down to its essence: what I thought mattered, what I believed was essential and what I spent my time doing. My daughter who is 13 recently said ‘Isn’t it crazy to be living inside a future history lesson?’ and I agreed. The biggest change I see in myself is an awareness of the ways I’ve been lucky in my life and a renewed sense of obligation to continue working on behalf of those who are struggling during this time.” – Laura Moulton, 50, Portland

“I have become so much more aware of everything around me. Suspicion consumes me sometimes. I am always looking at people who don’t wear a mask or wear one improperly or a mask that isn’t legitimate. Having my elderly mother with dementia living with me now since my dad died in August in the nursing home has changed me too. I know he died of loneliness because my mom who used to see him every day now could not see him at all. She would walk a mile to go see him and then be turned away. Sometimes she would fall, sometimes she would call me lost, sometimes her neighbor would call. My five grandchildren, I live for them and I am scared. I don’t understand those that don’t take this seriously. I just don’t.” – Terria Nightingale, 64, Dallas

“2020 has become a refuge, being comfortable in a place that is apart from the madness and turmoil, a place and time for going inward. I have slowed down, postponing and canceling so much of the busyness of our times. I read more, I write more, I dearly appreciate my world.” – Neal Lemery, 67, near Tillamook

“I am a wedding planner, which I say from the top because COVID has done to the wedding industry what I hoped to do to the wedding industry: Killed it. This is very challenging news for my fellow vendors. We are, like so many, trying to figure out how to make a living in this new world. It is also, I think, very good news, particularly for couples who want to start a marriage.

“I have seen COVID force couples to have the conversations that I have advocated they have for years. The pandemic has made them ask the most important question in all of wedding planning. Not the when or the where or the how much but the why. Why are we getting married?

“The answer is usually all about love, and that’s a beautiful thing. I look forward to seeing what it means for the future.” – Elisabeth Kramer, 30, Portland

“I used to be spontaneous. Now I don’t go anywhere without studying the rules of engagement: I have to know how to approach any store, restaurant or other venue intimately before I go there, and when they make minor adjustments, I tend to freak out. Hopefully, I’ll get over this phase and learn to roll with the punches.” – Robert Mohrman, 69, Portland

“My life is either that of a hermit as I stay home most of the time, or when I absolutely must be in public, hazmat, where I wear my Moldex 8000 respirator, my lab gloves, and my glasses to protect myself. I did meet my new sweetheart at Market of Choice in Eugene back in September while dressed in full hazmat. It was like a masquerade because he was wearing a surgical mask and I was behind him and I recognized him from the back by his hair and his walk. We worked together for about seven years, many years past,  and saw each other once in a while. When I said, ‘Adam is that you?’ He turned and was shocked to see me like that, he wasn’t sure who I was, but he said, ‘Yvonne, is that you?’ I told him I had moved to Yachats, and was alone, so we exchanged numbers, and it later was clear that he too was alone. We now have the beginning of a blossoming relationship to look forward to, instead of navigating the cold, dark winter alone.” – Yvonne Hall, 59, Yachats

“We might not return to ‘normal,’ but life is too precious to give up or be careless. I miss people and places and activities outside my home. It’s only for a little while longer and then we can move forward to something new and exciting. I don’t think I will change that much. I know I will appreciate life even more.  I will probably explore more places and meet more people and create more friendships along with all the friends I miss now.” – Patrice Toombs, 70, Roseburg

Oregon Moves From ‘Freeze’ to Tiered Risk Restrictions

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Street restriction signs on SE Center street at 72nd avenue on Wed., May 13, 2020. The restrictions are part of the city of Portland’s “Slow Streets Safe Streets” initiative, which is meant to allow more space for pedestrians and cyclists to maintain social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic. Dave Killen / Staff The Oregonian

On Thursday, Oregon moves out of the “freeze” put in place by Gov. Kate Brown and into a tiered framework designating each county by risk levels with different restrictions for each tier.

A county’s placement in each tier will generally be based on the two-week rate of cases per 100,000 residents for populous counties, and the total number of cases for counties with less than 30,000 people. It will also be based on each county’s positivity rate.

Twenty-five Oregon counties, including Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas, have been deemed at “extreme risk” and face the most restrictions.

You can read a full explanation of each of the state’s tiers, and how they’ll be measured, at the state’s coronavirus website.

Here is what you can and cannot do under each tier:

Extreme Risk Tier 

Under the tier with the most elevated risk category, social gatherings inside and outside are limited to six people with a recommended limit of two households.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 50 people total and a maximum party size of six people. All establishments must close by 11 p.m.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms must remain closed as well as indoor recreation facilities like movie theaters and museums. Outdoor recreational facilities — including pools, parks and outdoor fitness classes, are limited to 50 people.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 50% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is smaller. Outdoor services are limited to 150 people and the state recommended keeping services to an hour or less.

Remote work is encouraged, when possible, and public offices should be closed.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 50 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities must take place outside, with limited exceptions.

Counties in the extreme risk tier: Baker, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Douglas, Grant, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Umatilla, Union, Wasco, Washington and Yamhill

High Risk Tier

 

Under the second-highest risk category, social gatherings inside are limited to six people with a recommended limit of two households. Outdoor gatherings are limited to eight people.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 25% or 50 people inside, whichever is smaller. Outdoor dining will be capped at 75 people and all establishments must close by 11 p.m.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms, as well as indoor entertainment facilities, will be limited to 50 people or 25% capacity, whichever is smaller.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 50% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 25% capacity or 150 people, whichever is smaller. Outdoor services are limited to 200 people.

Remote work is encouraged, when possible.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 75 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities are allowed.

Counties in the high risk tier: Benton, Clatsop, Coos, Curry and Lincoln

Moderate Risk Tier 

Under the moderate risk tier, social gatherings inside are limited to eight people with a recommended limit of two households. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 10 people.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 50% or 100 people inside, whichever is smaller, and with a maximum of six people per table. Outdoor dining will be capped at 150 people and all establishments must close by 11 p.m.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms, as well as indoor entertainment facilities, will be limited to 100 people or 50% capacity, whichever is smaller.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 75% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 50% capacity or 150 people, whichever is smaller. Outdoor services are limited to 250 people.

Remote work is encouraged, when possible.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 150 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities are allowed.

Counties in the moderate risk tier: Harney and Tillamook

Lower Risk Tier

Under the state’s lowest risk tier, social gatherings inside are limited to 10 people with a recommended limit of four households. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 12 people.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 50% people inside. Outdoor dining will be capped at 300 people and all establishments must close by midnight. Table size indoors and outdoors will be limited to eight people.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms, as well as indoor entertainment facilities, will be limited to 50% capacity.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 75% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 75% capacity. Outdoor services are limited to 300 people.

Limited office work is allowed.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 300 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities are allowed.

Counties in the lower risk tier: Gilliam, Sherman, Wallowa and Wheeler

— Kale Williams; kwilliams@oregonian.com; 503-294-4048; @sfkale

The source of this article can be found, here.

New COVID-19 Safety Requirements

 

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Oregon OSHA released new COVID-19 safety workplace rules effective Monday. Employers must provide masks, face coverings, or face shields for employees free of charge. Brooke Herbert/The Oregonian/OregonLive

New protections against the spread of coronavirus in Oregon workplaces go into effect Monday.

Oregon OSHA now will require employers to take a series of steps, some phased in, to reduce the risk of COVID-19.

The temporary rules will require employers to notify employees of a workplace COVID-19 infection and assess the risk of exposure to their workers. Another rule is that employers allow workers to wear a face covering even if not required.

Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA, said the rules would reduce “the serious threat to workers” from the pandemic. “It does so by establishing a clear, practical, and consistent set of measures for employers,” he said.

These rules are separate from the “pause” that started Nov. 11 in nine counties and the “freeze” that begins statewide on Wednesday and affects many businesses.

Under the freeze, Gov. Kate Brown is limiting all bars and restaurants to takeout only, closing gyms, limiting capacity at grocery stories and pharmacies, and requiring remote work when possible. The statewide freeze will be effective Wednesday and run through Dec. 2, except in Multnomah County where it lasts at least four weeks.

 The new OSHA workplace requirements, according to the state of Oregon:
  • Employers must ensure six-foot distancing between people in the workplace, unless it is not feasible for some activities.
  • Employers must notify affected workers within 24 hours of a work-related COVID-19 infection.
  • Employers must ensure that employees, part-timers and customers – at the workplace, or other place under the employer’s control — wear a mask, face covering, or face shield.
  • Employers must provide masks, face coverings, or face shields for employees free of charge.
  • If an employee chooses to wear a face covering, the employer must allow it even if government rules don’t require it.
  • When employees are transported for work-related purposes, all people inside the vehicle must wear a mask, face covering, or face shield, regardless of distance or duration of the trip, unless all people in the vehicle are members of the same household.
  • Employers must involve employees and incorporate their feedback to gauge risks of exposure to COVID-19, effective Dec. 7.
  • Employers must draw up an infection control plan that includes when workers must use personal protective equipment and that describes other measures to control specific hazards, effective Dec. 7.
  • Employers must provide information and training about COVID-19 to workers in a manner and language the workers understand, effective Dec. 21.

There are additional requirements, especially for high-risk jobs, such as first responders and people who work with patients.

A separate executive order by Gov. Kate Brown extended COVID-19 protections for agricultural workers in employer-provided housing through the off season.

Read the temporary rule, which includes provisions for specific industries and workplace activities, at https://osha.oregon.gov/OSHARules/div1/437-001-0744.pdf.

Multnomah County, Washington, Clackamas and Marion counties, among others, are in the midst of a two-week pause to try to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

The freeze, starting Wednesday, also affects many businesses in addition to restaurants, bars and gyms. The freeze requires:

–Closing indoor recreational facilities, museums, indoor entertainment activities, and indoor pools and sports courts.
–Closing outdoor recreational facilities, zoos, gardens, aquariums, outdoor entertainment activities, and outdoor pools.
–Limiting grocery stores and pharmacies to a maximum of 75% capacity and encouraging curbside pick-up.
–Limiting retail stores and retail malls (indoor and outdoor) to a maximum of 75% capacity and encouraging curbside pick-up.
–Closing venues (that host or facilitate indoor or outdoor events).

–Requiring all businesses to mandate work-from-home to the greatest extent possible and closing offices to the public.

Hair, nail and other personal service salons, such as massage therapy businesses, can remain open with existing limitations. State health officials said the businesses had not been associated with spread of coronavirus and some, such as physical therapy, were important to health.

The new OSHA rules are temporary but are expected to be in effect until May 4, 2021.”

This article was written by Brooke Herbert of the Oregonian. The source can be found, here.

The Pandemic Boosts Portland Office Space

Businesses turn their interests into suburban markets for more space and to be closer to their employees.

In the third quarter of 2020, the amount of office space in Portland has increased compared with the previous quarter as a result of the pandemic, causing companies to reevaluate the location and space they need for their employees. In the second quarter, total office space has increased from 15.5 percent to 17 percent; The commercial real estate firm says that although this dip is abnormal, it has grown due to more companies subleasing their office space or not renewing leases. 

The nature of office work has been influenced completely by the COVID-19 pandemic, with many employees working from home and fewer workers going into the office due to social-distancing requirements. Some businesses have chosen to get rid of the office altogether, resulting in all employees working from home. 

“The trend has profound implications for Portland downtown businesses that rely on foot traffic from office workers, such as restaurants and retailers, and hotels that rely on business travelers” (Moore, 4).

The pandemic draws more attention to the suburban market for offices, leading to a renaissance of suburban-office markets. The vacancy rate for office space in the suburbs was 10.7% in the third quarter, virtually unchanged from the previous quarter – this includes Beaverton, Hillsboro, Clackamas, and Tualatin.

The trending increased interest in the suburban market has stood out for tenants interested in more space and being closer to their employees. 

Although downtown had the largest increase in vacancy rates, the three biggest deals of the third quarter were located in the downtown area. 

Tenants have leaned towards flexible or short-term leases due to the uncertainty that comes with the coronavirus and how the office market will adapt.

 

Agent Website Photos-KristaThis blog post was written by Krista Pham, our intern.

The article that inspired this piece can be found, here.