Oregon Moves From ‘Freeze’ to Tiered Risk Restrictions

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Street restriction signs on SE Center street at 72nd avenue on Wed., May 13, 2020. The restrictions are part of the city of Portland’s “Slow Streets Safe Streets” initiative, which is meant to allow more space for pedestrians and cyclists to maintain social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic. Dave Killen / Staff The Oregonian

On Thursday, Oregon moves out of the “freeze” put in place by Gov. Kate Brown and into a tiered framework designating each county by risk levels with different restrictions for each tier.

A county’s placement in each tier will generally be based on the two-week rate of cases per 100,000 residents for populous counties, and the total number of cases for counties with less than 30,000 people. It will also be based on each county’s positivity rate.

Twenty-five Oregon counties, including Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas, have been deemed at “extreme risk” and face the most restrictions.

You can read a full explanation of each of the state’s tiers, and how they’ll be measured, at the state’s coronavirus website.

Here is what you can and cannot do under each tier:

Extreme Risk Tier 

Under the tier with the most elevated risk category, social gatherings inside and outside are limited to six people with a recommended limit of two households.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 50 people total and a maximum party size of six people. All establishments must close by 11 p.m.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms must remain closed as well as indoor recreation facilities like movie theaters and museums. Outdoor recreational facilities — including pools, parks and outdoor fitness classes, are limited to 50 people.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 50% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is smaller. Outdoor services are limited to 150 people and the state recommended keeping services to an hour or less.

Remote work is encouraged, when possible, and public offices should be closed.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 50 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities must take place outside, with limited exceptions.

Counties in the extreme risk tier: Baker, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Douglas, Grant, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Umatilla, Union, Wasco, Washington and Yamhill

High Risk Tier

 

Under the second-highest risk category, social gatherings inside are limited to six people with a recommended limit of two households. Outdoor gatherings are limited to eight people.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 25% or 50 people inside, whichever is smaller. Outdoor dining will be capped at 75 people and all establishments must close by 11 p.m.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms, as well as indoor entertainment facilities, will be limited to 50 people or 25% capacity, whichever is smaller.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 50% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 25% capacity or 150 people, whichever is smaller. Outdoor services are limited to 200 people.

Remote work is encouraged, when possible.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 75 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities are allowed.

Counties in the high risk tier: Benton, Clatsop, Coos, Curry and Lincoln

Moderate Risk Tier 

Under the moderate risk tier, social gatherings inside are limited to eight people with a recommended limit of two households. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 10 people.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 50% or 100 people inside, whichever is smaller, and with a maximum of six people per table. Outdoor dining will be capped at 150 people and all establishments must close by 11 p.m.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms, as well as indoor entertainment facilities, will be limited to 100 people or 50% capacity, whichever is smaller.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 75% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 50% capacity or 150 people, whichever is smaller. Outdoor services are limited to 250 people.

Remote work is encouraged, when possible.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 150 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities are allowed.

Counties in the moderate risk tier: Harney and Tillamook

Lower Risk Tier

Under the state’s lowest risk tier, social gatherings inside are limited to 10 people with a recommended limit of four households. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 12 people.

Restaurants and bars are allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining, but with a maximum capacity of 50% people inside. Outdoor dining will be capped at 300 people and all establishments must close by midnight. Table size indoors and outdoors will be limited to eight people.

Indoor recreation facilities and gyms, as well as indoor entertainment facilities, will be limited to 50% capacity.

Retail stores, including indoor and outdoor malls, can remain open, but with a limit of 75% of their total capacity. Curbside pickup is encouraged.

Faith institutions like churches, synagogues and mosques can hold services indoors, but are limited to either 75% capacity. Outdoor services are limited to 300 people.

Limited office work is allowed.

Outdoor recreation facilities, like zoos and stadiums, are limited to 300 people.

Personal services like salons are allowed to operate normally.

Visits to long-term care facilities are allowed.

Counties in the lower risk tier: Gilliam, Sherman, Wallowa and Wheeler

— Kale Williams; kwilliams@oregonian.com; 503-294-4048; @sfkale

The source of this article can be found, here.

New COVID-19 Safety Requirements

 

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Oregon OSHA released new COVID-19 safety workplace rules effective Monday. Employers must provide masks, face coverings, or face shields for employees free of charge. Brooke Herbert/The Oregonian/OregonLive

New protections against the spread of coronavirus in Oregon workplaces go into effect Monday.

Oregon OSHA now will require employers to take a series of steps, some phased in, to reduce the risk of COVID-19.

The temporary rules will require employers to notify employees of a workplace COVID-19 infection and assess the risk of exposure to their workers. Another rule is that employers allow workers to wear a face covering even if not required.

Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA, said the rules would reduce “the serious threat to workers” from the pandemic. “It does so by establishing a clear, practical, and consistent set of measures for employers,” he said.

These rules are separate from the “pause” that started Nov. 11 in nine counties and the “freeze” that begins statewide on Wednesday and affects many businesses.

Under the freeze, Gov. Kate Brown is limiting all bars and restaurants to takeout only, closing gyms, limiting capacity at grocery stories and pharmacies, and requiring remote work when possible. The statewide freeze will be effective Wednesday and run through Dec. 2, except in Multnomah County where it lasts at least four weeks.

 The new OSHA workplace requirements, according to the state of Oregon:
  • Employers must ensure six-foot distancing between people in the workplace, unless it is not feasible for some activities.
  • Employers must notify affected workers within 24 hours of a work-related COVID-19 infection.
  • Employers must ensure that employees, part-timers and customers – at the workplace, or other place under the employer’s control — wear a mask, face covering, or face shield.
  • Employers must provide masks, face coverings, or face shields for employees free of charge.
  • If an employee chooses to wear a face covering, the employer must allow it even if government rules don’t require it.
  • When employees are transported for work-related purposes, all people inside the vehicle must wear a mask, face covering, or face shield, regardless of distance or duration of the trip, unless all people in the vehicle are members of the same household.
  • Employers must involve employees and incorporate their feedback to gauge risks of exposure to COVID-19, effective Dec. 7.
  • Employers must draw up an infection control plan that includes when workers must use personal protective equipment and that describes other measures to control specific hazards, effective Dec. 7.
  • Employers must provide information and training about COVID-19 to workers in a manner and language the workers understand, effective Dec. 21.

There are additional requirements, especially for high-risk jobs, such as first responders and people who work with patients.

A separate executive order by Gov. Kate Brown extended COVID-19 protections for agricultural workers in employer-provided housing through the off season.

Read the temporary rule, which includes provisions for specific industries and workplace activities, at https://osha.oregon.gov/OSHARules/div1/437-001-0744.pdf.

Multnomah County, Washington, Clackamas and Marion counties, among others, are in the midst of a two-week pause to try to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

The freeze, starting Wednesday, also affects many businesses in addition to restaurants, bars and gyms. The freeze requires:

–Closing indoor recreational facilities, museums, indoor entertainment activities, and indoor pools and sports courts.
–Closing outdoor recreational facilities, zoos, gardens, aquariums, outdoor entertainment activities, and outdoor pools.
–Limiting grocery stores and pharmacies to a maximum of 75% capacity and encouraging curbside pick-up.
–Limiting retail stores and retail malls (indoor and outdoor) to a maximum of 75% capacity and encouraging curbside pick-up.
–Closing venues (that host or facilitate indoor or outdoor events).

–Requiring all businesses to mandate work-from-home to the greatest extent possible and closing offices to the public.

Hair, nail and other personal service salons, such as massage therapy businesses, can remain open with existing limitations. State health officials said the businesses had not been associated with spread of coronavirus and some, such as physical therapy, were important to health.

The new OSHA rules are temporary but are expected to be in effect until May 4, 2021.”

This article was written by Brooke Herbert of the Oregonian. The source can be found, here.