Top Dog Ben Yang

Top Dog Ben Yang

 

Our top dog is someone on our team that deserves recognition for many different reasons!

 

This month’s Top Dog goes to Ben Yang-

 

A member of NextHome Realty Connection for just under three years, Ben has been a dynamic addition to the NHRC team, continuing to grow steadily each year.

While his production is what marked him as the Top Dog this month, it is his passion for real estate, both in service and investment, that is truly inspirational. Considering real estate to be a way of life, Ben practices what he preaches, currently holding 20 rentals himself. Not one to keep success close to the vest, Ben enjoys assisting agents looking to have their questions answered just as much as he enjoys having the opportunity to educate clients through the process of buying or selling a home.

A husband and father to kids ages 4 and 6, Ben and his family stay busy and have no plans to move at this time, though remodeling may very well be in their future. When he and the family are not busy in real estate they enjoy taking time to travel, though there have not been as many long trips since the pandemic.

 

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These U.S. Cities Have Seen the Biggest Hike in Rent Prices

SOURCE

As inflation, higher interest and mortgage rates, lack of supply and skyrocketing house prices combine to make the housing market a very unwelcoming place for new home buyers, things aren’t looking any brighter for renters.

Rent prices have increased sharply in the last few decades, with a surge of 149 percent in the median rental prices reported in the U.S. between 1985 and 2020, according to data from Real Estate Witch, a service that provides real estate advice.

In the same period, the average median income grew by only 35 percent, meaning rent prices rose four times faster than people’s wages.

The COVID-19 pandemic might have offered a moment of respite to the rental market, with prices declining by as much as 20 percent in some cities across the country. But, like many other sectors and activities after the end of lockdowns and restrictions, rental prices have rebounded.

Rent prices have been surging in the U.S., with cities like Salt Lake City, Jersey City and Portland seeing the biggest increases for both one- and two-bedroom apartments. The above photo shows a building advertising apartments for rent in San Francisco, California.JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES

Real Estate Witch found that the two percent growth rate in rent prices common in 2019 has now doubled.

These, according to Rent.com, are the cities where rent prices have increased the most year-on-year in the month of June, comparing 2021 with 2022, for one-bedroom apartments:

  1. Austin, Texas (+ 108.2 percent)
  2. Jersey City, New Jersey (+ 51.6 percent)
  3. Tempe, Arizona (+ 49.3 percent)
  4. New York, New York (+ 41.0 percent)
  5. Salt Lake City, Utah (+ 40.5 percent)
  6. Long Beach, California (+ 39.6 percent)
  7. Fremont, California (+ 38.2 percent)
  8. Richmond, Virginia (+ 35.7 percent)
  9. Tacoma, Washington (+ 32.8 percent)
  10. Portland, Oregon (+ 32.2 percent)

Six of the cities in this list—Jersey City, Tacoma, Fremont, Tempe, Richmond and Salt Lake City—have populations of 300,000 or less. Some of the same cities also experienced the biggest rent prices increases for two-bedrooms apartments, year-on-year, in June:

  1. Jersey City, New Jersey (+ 57.7 percent)
  2. Fort Wayne, Indiana (+ 56.5 percent)
  3. Salt Lake City, Utah (+ 53.9 percent)
  4. Durham, North Carolina (+ 51.3 percent)
  5. Raleigh, North Carolina (+ 48.9 percent)
  6. Knoxville, Tenneessee (+ 47.8 percent)
  7. Lexington, Kentucky (+ 47.2 percent)
  8. Fayetteville, North Carolina (+ 41.7 percent)
  9. Portland, Oregon (+ 39.1 percent)
  10. Mesa, Arizona (+ 37.5 percent)

From the two lists combined, we get three cities that have overall been affected by the biggest rent increases: Jersey City, Portland, and Salt Lake City, which have suffered higher prices for both one- and two-bedroom apartments.

The reason why rent is going higher in these cities is the same as across most of the country but is exacerbated by the specific situation of these urban metros: rising inflation and more demand than there is supply.

At this pace, renting a place is becoming less and less affordable in these cities. For many, it means living paycheck to paycheck, and being unable to save—a key step on the way to homeownership.

But as home prices increase at the same time as rent, many wishing to buy a home might see this dream slip away. Rental prices have partially increased because of the number of people who, unable to buy a home, have flooded the rental market.

The same lack of supply which drove up competition in the housing market exists in the rental market and has left landlords the power to rise rent without fear of losing potential tenants, as the number of apartments available is limited.

As people start falling behind rent, evictions have gone back to the levels they were before the pandemic, the non-profit news organization Truthout reported in March.

Rent prices have, though, stabilized this month, according to Rent.com, and prices for two-bedroom apartments have decreased by 13 percent year-on-year at the state level.

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Top Dog: Irina Dobrotolyubov

Our top dog is someone on our team that deserves recognition for many different reasons!

 

This month’s Top Dog goes to Irina Dobrotolyubov~

 

Irina Dobrotolyubov is an agent based in Portland, Oregon. She is bilingual, speaking both English and Russian, and is eager to help Russian-speaking Portlanders with their real estate needs! Irina is passionate about serving others and will always go the extra mile to ensure each transaction runs smoothly.

 

Irina has a Youtube channel linked HERE where she goes above and beyond and makes informative videos about the real estate industry. She started the Youtube channel in January of 2021 and has already hit over 6k subscribers and over 440,000 views. These videos range from “all the latest news in the world of real estate, the work-force, and the economy, and.. “behind-the-scenes” of her life as a real estate agent through vlogs”.

 

She is also a proud member of the Parkrose, Portland community. On her Park Bench page linked HERE, you can find interviews with business owners, events in the neighborhood, local businesses, and more. 

 

Irina’s passion for real estate is evident in her work. She inspires all of us to go the extra mile and be passionate about what we do on a daily basis. She has a natural ability to connect with people, which makes her an incredibly valued part of our Next Home Realty Connection team.

Mortgage rates dropped half a percentage point in two weeks

SOURCE

 

Mortgage rates fell for the second straight week, but failed to bolster weakened homebuyer demand.

The rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage pulled back to 5.30% this week, down from 5.70% the week prior, according to Freddie Mac. While rates dropped by half a percentage point within two weeks – they remain nearly two percentage points higher than at the start of the year.

Rising borrowing costs have depressed purchase activity as price-stricken buyers face challenging affordability conditions, inflation, and record low inventory levels. Meanwhile, homeowners are hunkering down reluctant to sell or refinance – which would entail giving up their ultra-low rates.

“Over the last two weeks, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage dropped by half a percent, as concerns about a potential recession continue to rise,” Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist, said in a press statement. “While the drop provides minor relief to buyers, the housing market will continue to normalize if home price growth materially slows due to the combination of low housing affordability and an expected economic downturn.”

Homes are seen for sale in the northwest area of Portland, Oregon March 20, 2014. Would-be buyers risk being crowded out by the run-up in home prices and mortgage rates over the past year. Home values nationwide were up 12 percent in January from the same month last year, according to data firm CoreLogic, while mortgage rates have jumped about a full percentage point.   REUTERS/Steve Dipaola  (UNITED STATES - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)
Homes are seen for sale in the northwest area of Portland, Oregon. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola (UNITED STATES – Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS)

The slowdown in rates occurred as the U.S. Treasury yield – which mortgage rates closely track – dropped below 3% for the first time since early June. The financial markets shifted toward the safety of bonds as concerns brewed this week over an economic slowdown, while fears of a potential recession grew stronger.

However, this downturn in mortgage rates may be short-lived as the Federal Reserve plans to increase the benchmark interest rate by some 1.75 percentage points over the rest of the year to tame runaway inflation – currently at 40-year highs.

Although some industry experts argue that mortgage rates have priced in most of the Fed’s rate hikes, housing activity has notably cooled in recent weeks.

“The market is always going to ebb and flow and there’s always going to be housing prices and interest rates that move regardless of whether you buy a house or don’t buy a house,” Scott Sheldon, branch manager at New American Funding, told Yahoo Money. “I’ve never with the exception of 2008, have seen anybody buy a house and go financially backwards who have held the house for five years or longer.”

Still, the recent rate volatility has cratered homebuyer confidence.

The Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment index fell to 64.8 in June, its second-lowest reading in a decade. At least 81% of consumers surveyed believe the economy is on the “wrong track,” and a majority of respondents said it would be difficult to get a mortgage as sky-high home prices eat away at their budgets.

The signs of a cooling housing market are already evident.

The volume of mortgage applications decreased for the second week in a row, down 5.4% on a seasonally adjusted basis from one week ago, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association survey for the week ending July 1. The purchase index increased slightly by 7% compared to a week ago, but was 17% lower than the same week a year ago.

“Demand is lower but it’s still relatively strong,” Nadia Evangelou, senior economist and director of forecasting at the National Association of Realtors, told Yahoo Money. “Home prices continue to rise due to low inventory. Although inventory should increase [in the next few months], the transition of renters into homeownership is even more challenging because of weakened affordability.”

While inventory levels increased nearly 29% from a year ago, Evangelou noted that not all first-time homebuyers can afford these new listings.

“We want to help the middle income buyer to be able to afford to purchase a home, however we’re not there yet,” Evangelou said. “It’s great news to see more homes available in the market, but more entry level homes are needed.”

Data from Realtor.com showed the June national median listing price was $450,000, up 16.9% compared to last year and up 31.4% from June 2020. Just last week, when rates were 5.70%, homebuyers were looking at a monthly payment of about $2,100 – before adding taxes or insurance fees – that was more than $790 higher than June 2021.

At today’s rate of 5.30%, the payment on a median priced home would be $1,999, so about $690 higher than last year.

However, there’s one silver lining for first-time buyers. As more homes hit the market, some sellers may be forced to compete on prices. According to Realtor.com, 14.9% of listings across the U.S. lowered prices in the last month, the largest amount since the pandemic began.

A house on sale is seen in Washington D.C., the United States on Dec. 12, 2021. U.S. annual home price growth remained strong at 18 percent in October, the highest recorded in the 45-year history of the index, according to CoreLogic's Home Price Index. (Photo by Ting Shen/Xinhua via Getty Images)
A house on sale is seen in Washington D.C., the United States on Dec. 12, 2021. U.S. annual home price growth remained strong at 18 percent in October, the highest recorded in the 45-year history of the index, according to CoreLogic’s Home Price Index. (Photo by Ting Shen/Xinhua via Getty Images)

“Though the cost of financing a home remains high relative to recent years,” Realtor.com senior economic research analyst, Joel Berner said in a press statement, “buyers will have more chances to find homes in their price range as the undersupplied and overheated housing market starts to cool.”

Homeowners, too, have been hit hard by growing borrowing costs.

For most homeowners, rising mortgage rates have narrowed the opportunities to refinance at a lower rate from slim to none. According to the MBA, the refinance activity is down 78% from a year ago.

“Those that refinanced last year, may not want to sell [or refi] now because they’re not going to find the same loan terms they once did,” Evangelou said.

For some, it’s even paused any plans to tap into their built equity – which has grown to record highs within the past two years. As rates surged in recent weeks, the cost of accessing that equity has also increased.

“They don’t want to give up their 3.2% or 2.8% 30-year rate on their first mortgage,” Scott Sheldon, branch manager at New American Funding, told Yahoo Money. “I don’t blame them, I don’t know if I would want to give that up either.”

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Oregon Country Fair to return for 2022

SOURCE

VENETA, Ore. — For the first time since 2019, the Oregon Country Fair will be held near Veneta with a few changes to adjust to the post-pandemic world.

The annual Oregon Country Fair is billed as a celebration of art, music, earth and family. This year will be the first year it has been held since 2019 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The event annually draws around 45,000 visitors to the Veneta area over its three days, but organizers say this year attendance is capped at 30,000. Businesses are excited, as the influx of attendees will bring greater foot traffic to the area. However, many residents are less enthusiastic due to the occasionally unruly behavior of Country Fair participants in past years.

New for this year, the Country Fair will require proof of a current COVID-19 vaccination or proof of a negative COVID test taken within 24 hours prior to attending the event for all participants. Event organizers are requiring test results from a licensed test or health care provider or laboratory, meaning that home test results will not be accepted.

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Equifax Collects Your Data, and Then Sells It. Credit companies like Equifax make money by mining a huge trove of data.

SOURCE

BY KEN SWEET, AP BUSINESS WRITER

 

Equifax knows a lot about you. That is, in essence, how it makes money.

The company and its competitors have in their files the personal financial information of tens of millions of Americans like you, going back decades. Your mortgage loan totals. When you switched from a Macy’s card to a Target card. How much you still owe for college.

“It’s a pretty simple business model, actually. They gather as much information about you from lenders, aggregate it, and sell it back to them,” said Brett Horn, an industry analyst with Morningstar.

Equifax had more than $3.1 billion in revenue last year, largely from selling data to other companies. Experian’s revenue came to $4.34 billion, while TransUnion had $1.7 billion.

The trove of data — Equifax’s largest asset — has become its biggest liability after the company admitted that it didn’t keep the information safe from criminals who stole or accessed the data on 143 million Americans who are now at risk for identity theft. It’s now under investigation at the state and federal level, facing a series of lawsuits, and desperately trying to assuage the anger of the consumers who are its commodities.

What to know about how the credit companies work:

Where the money comes from

Equifax, Experian and TransUnion make most of their money selling bulk lists to banks and credit card companies.

American Express, for example, could purchase a list of potential customers 25 to 30 years old with credit scores above 650. Armed with that, AmEx will send out pre-approved credit card mailers, hoping to sign up new customers.

Hundreds of millions of credit reports are sold this way each year to companies like Capital One, JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup. Since the banks buy the reports in bulk, they pay as little as a few dollars per report. While people can get their credit reports once a year for free, Equifax charges $15.95 for the report plus a credit score, while Experian charges $19.95 for a report and score.

The credit bureaus also sell credit reports to potential employers. About 45 percent of companies with 2,500 to 24,999 employees do background credit checks on some job applicants, according to a 2012 study by the Society for Human Resource Management. While employers cannot get a person’s credit score, they can discover legal judgments or bankruptcies.

And there are products like fraud protection services and credit monitoring. Equifax normally sells a package of credit monitoring services for $19.95 a month. Experian is more involved in that market, but has gotten into some hot water. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau fined Experian $3 million in March for selling misleading credit scores to consumers.

Critics of the credit companies argue that Equifax could make some money off its own security failings. Its TrustedID product, which it is offering free for a year to people whose information was exposed, could retain some customers. LifeLock, another identity theft product, has also seen increased interest since the breach — but it buys its protection services from Equifax.

Finally, the company charges fees to customers who want to freeze or unfreeze their credit files. Those fees vary by state, and Equifax has waived them in the wake of the data breach.

How the circle works

The credit companies get information, such as whether you’ve paid your bills on time each month, largely for free.

An estimated 10,000 different companies and sources report information about you to Equifax, TransUnion and Experian, according to a 2012 study by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Industry experts say that figure could be as high as 30,000.

That information gets compiled into your individual credit report, pooled with data from banks to build a comprehensive picture of your financial history, and your potential financial risk.

Banks are just as reliant on the credit companies. Without the credit reports, a customer could default on a loan, then apply for another elsewhere without the new bank knowing the person’s history. The U.S. has thousands of individual lenders and banks, so very rarely could one bank offer a complete picture of a person’s financial history.

Often, banks make credit decisions based almost entirely on what they see in a credit report from these companies.

“They are the gatekeepers to whether you can get a credit card or an affordable car loan or a house,” said Chi Chi Wu, a longtime critic of the credit-reporting industry and a lawyer at the National Consumer Law Center.

The origin of credit companies

Equifax, TransUnion and Experian are often referred to as credit bureaus or agencies, which lends them an official air. But they’re private companies without government affiliation.

How the companies got to hold information on so many millions of people in the first place is largely due to their position in a lightly regulated part of the U.S. financial system. The credit companies are governed by one main federal law, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, which requires the companies to give you access to your data once a year and allow for disputes. Most of the regulation in the industry happens at the state level.

It’s also incredibly difficult to opt out of the system. You could live an all-cash lifestyle, never requesting credit from any bank, but still wind up with your information in the hands of the credit companies through less-obvious sources like cable or phone companies, property tax bills, or doctors’ offices.

Customers like this are known as “thin file” borrowers, because of the lack of information, but that doesn’t stop Equifax, Experian and TransUnion from building files on you. In these cases, the companies might only have a name, address, maybe a Social Security number — but that data could still be enough to start the process of identity theft.

Ken Sweet covers banks and consumer financial issues for The Associated Press. Follow him on Twitter at @kensweet.

–The Associated Press

Rebecca Nelson

Top Dog: Rebecca Nelson

Next Home Realty Connection’s Top Dog- 

Our top dog is someone on our team that deserves recognition for many different reasons!

 

Our first top dog goes to Rebecca Nelson for always being a team player and an amazing role model to us all. She always takes initiative on being a part of her community, family, and team. 

For example, Rebecca, Maryann, and Christina stepped up for our annual Luke day and came up with Luke’s Literature. Through Luke’s Literature, they were able to donate books to over 10 schools. This is only one example of how Rebecca always steps up for her community. 

 

Rebecca has been with NextHome Realty Connection for over 8 years as a principal broker in Oregon. Her passion for real estate comes from her passion of helping build and connect communities. She enjoys being a resource and advocate for clients and whatever their goals are. 

 

When it comes to our team, she is always first in line to learn new programs and to be able to assist anyone that may have questions on her own accord. We don’t even need to ask her! She will take the initiative and put the responsibility on herself to ensure her teammates feel confident in their growth. Rebecca is also a mentor and coach to a few of our agents helping them grow through support and knowledge. She is involved with the Rebecca Mountain Coaching program, a program where agents support one another in their growth.

 

In her free time, Rebecca enjoys reading books, playing a variety of games, hiking, and volunteering. Some of the volunteering she does is at the Griffin Oaks Tiny Library and at her local school district. At the library, she participates in and organizes community events. 

Rebecca was recently put on the “strategic planning core team” at her local school district where she will help set up visions and goals for the entire district this summer and fall. But she doesn’t stop there! She has also begun volunteering for “Rebuilding Together Washington County (RTWC).. an affiliate of Rebuilding Together, a leading national nonprofit in safe and healthy housing that provides low-income homeowners with critical home repairs.” https://www.togwc.org/

 

“Rebecca is working on herself and I see great things coming from it. Becca also loves education and teaching our agents the ins and outs of real estate with patience and guidance. She loves working with the new agents and seeing them grow. Watching them succeed is her greatest joy!

She is also involved in many sports events with her two older sons, countless PTA meetings, and always looking to better the education in our school systems. She volunteers countless hours to help her community. Everything she does in life, she does with fire and compassion.“

-Christina Saribay

Equifax Collects Your Data, and Then Sells It

Credit companies like Equifax make money by mining a huge trove of data.

Equifax Collects Your Data, and Then Sells It
Getty Images

Equifax knows a lot about you. That is, in essence, how it makes money.

The company and its competitors have in their files the personal financial information of tens of millions of Americans like you, going back decades. Your mortgage loan totals. When you switched from a Macy’s card to a Target card. How much you still owe for college.

“It’s a pretty simple business model, actually. They gather as much information about you from lenders, aggregate it, and sell it back to them,” said Brett Horn, an industry analyst with Morningstar.

Equifax had more than $3.1 billion in revenue last year, largely from selling data to other companies. Experian’s revenue came to $4.34 billion, while TransUnion had $1.7 billion.

The trove of data — Equifax’s largest asset — has become its biggest liability after the company admitted that it didn’t keep the information safe from criminals who stole or accessed the data on 143 million Americans who are now at risk for identity theft. It’s now under investigation at the state and federal level, facing a series of lawsuits, and desperately trying to assuage the anger of the consumers who are its commodities.

What to know about how the credit companies work:

Where the money comes from

Equifax, Experian and TransUnion make most of their money selling bulk lists to banks and credit card companies.

American Express, for example, could purchase a list of potential customers 25 to 30 years old with credit scores above 650. Armed with that, AmEx will send out pre-approved credit card mailers, hoping to sign up new customers.

Hundreds of millions of credit reports are sold this way each year to companies like Capital One, JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup. Since the banks buy the reports in bulk, they pay as little as a few dollars per report. While people can get their credit reports once a year for free, Equifax charges $15.95 for the report plus a credit score, while Experian charges $19.95 for a report and score.

The credit bureaus also sell credit reports to potential employers. About 45 percent of companies with 2,500 to 24,999 employees do background credit checks on some job applicants, according to a 2012 study by the Society for Human Resource Management. While employers cannot get a person’s credit score, they can discover legal judgments or bankruptcies.

And there are products like fraud protection services and credit monitoring. Equifax normally sells a package of credit monitoring services for $19.95 a month. Experian is more involved in that market, but has gotten into some hot water. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau fined Experian $3 million in March for selling misleading credit scores to consumers.

Critics of the credit companies argue that Equifax could make some money off its own security failings. Its TrustedID product, which it is offering free for a year to people whose information was exposed, could retain some customers. LifeLock, another identity theft product, has also seen increased interest since the breach — but it buys its protection services from Equifax.

Finally, the company charges fees to customers who want to freeze or unfreeze their credit files. Those fees vary by state, and Equifax has waived them in the wake of the data breach.

How the circle works

The credit companies get information, such as whether you’ve paid your bills on time each month, largely for free.

An estimated 10,000 different companies and sources report information about you to Equifax, TransUnion and Experian, according to a 2012 study by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Industry experts say that figure could be as high as 30,000.

That information gets compiled into your individual credit report, pooled with data from banks to build a comprehensive picture of your financial history, and your potential financial risk.

Banks are just as reliant on the credit companies. Without the credit reports, a customer could default on a loan, then apply for another elsewhere without the new bank knowing the person’s history. The U.S. has thousands of individual lenders and banks, so very rarely could one bank offer a complete picture of a person’s financial history.

Often, banks make credit decisions based almost entirely on what they see in a credit report from these companies.

“They are the gatekeepers to whether you can get a credit card or an affordable car loan or a house,” said Chi Chi Wu, a longtime critic of the credit-reporting industry and a lawyer at the National Consumer Law Center.

The origin of credit companies

Equifax, TransUnion and Experian are often referred to as credit bureaus or agencies, which lends them an official air. But they’re private companies without government affiliation.

How the companies got to hold information on so many millions of people in the first place is largely due to their position in a lightly regulated part of the U.S. financial system. The credit companies are governed by one main federal law, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, which requires the companies to give you access to your data once a year and allow for disputes. Most of the regulation in the industry happens at the state level.

It’s also incredibly difficult to opt out of the system. You could live an all-cash lifestyle, never requesting credit from any bank, but still wind up with your information in the hands of the credit companies through less-obvious sources like cable or phone companies, property tax bills, or doctors’ offices.

Customers like this are known as “thin file” borrowers, because of the lack of information, but that doesn’t stop Equifax, Experian and TransUnion from building files on you. In these cases, the companies might only have a name, address, maybe a Social Security number — but that data could still be enough to start the process of identity theft.

Ken Sweet covers banks and consumer financial issues for The Associated Press. Follow him on Twitter at @kensweet.

–The Associated Press

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Portland property owner installing bike racks to deter camping

SOURCE

PORTLAND Ore. (KPTV) – After months of camping, crime, and drug use outside one of his buildings in downtown Portland, real estate mogul and philanthropist, Jordan Schnitzer, is using bike racks to clean up the sidewalk.

Schnitzer installed about two dozen metal bike racks along the block of Northwest Broadway between Northwest Flanders and Glisan Street. He’s not the only local business owner to do so in the downtown area. Planters and bike racks have been popping up in front of businesses in the “Furnishing Zone” of sidewalks. That’s the area between the curb and the pedestrian thorough-way that tends to have mailboxes, plants, and trash cans. It’s also a zone where many of the unhoused pitch a tent. Schnitzer’s bike racks take up the zone and the goal is to keep the space from being used to camp.

“It’s one way for us to promote bikes to people who ride bikes and two to help clean up the streets so tenants will look at this building and want to be here for their business,” Schnitzer said.

Schnitzer donates millions each year to help the unhoused get back on their feet. He owns the property Bybee Lakes Hope Center sits on. It houses 300 people and in its first year, the center saw 500 people experience homelessness walk through its doors. Schnitzer believes more investment in centers like this one will help make an impact on the crisis instead of encouraging camping on city streets.

“The bike racks are one solution, planters are another but the key is really helping people get off the streets and into facilities like the Bybee Lakes,” Schnitzer said.

Schnitzer admits he didn’t get permits for the bike racks because he didn’t know one was required. The Portland Bureau of Transportation said they were not aware of the bike racks and are looking at “next steps.” Schnitzer said he filed for a permit last Friday.

Schnitzer said there needs to be a fine line between helping those on the streets and remembering tax-paying stakeholders. In Schnitzer’s eyes, a successful and vibrant city starts with the real estate market and a vibrant downtown core. So the bike racks area small part in trying to bring Portland’s image back.

“We use to be a jewel nationally,” Schnitzer said. “Every other month the New York Times used to have an article about us being a foodie city or to visit, or about the mountains, or about the beach, or about all things we love. How this has gone down the sinkhole to be one of the embarrassments nationally, is staggering.”

What to Do in Oregon in June

SOURCE


Mouth, Data, Stef, Andy, and Brand discover some of the Oregon Coast’s subterranean secrets in 1985’s The Goonies.

Between the Rose Festival, a packed calendar of LGBTQ+ events for Portland Pride, and Portland Beer Week (but isn’t that every week?), there’s plenty to hold our interest close to home this month. But from crab derbies to maximum “Goonies never say die” vibes, the rest of the state is calling to us, too.

Nehalem Bay Crab Derby

6 a.m.–5 p.m. June 4, Wheeler 
Kelly’s Brighton Marina, on Nehalem Bay between Wheeler and Rockaway Beach, puts number tags on 26 crabs and releases them the morning of this annual event. Derby entrants catch as many as they can, and bring them to the marina by 5 p.m. for a drawing for the grand prize of $1,000. (There’s no mammogram or vasectomy on offer this year, thought they’ve been on the prize list in previous years.) There’s a $10 entry fee for the event, which is a fundraiser for the Mudd Nick Foundation and Animal Haven by the Sea Rescue. The derby also features vendors, raffles, and live music starting at 6 p.m. —Margaret Seiler

Goonies Day

June 7 (but there are events June 3–8), starting times and locations vary  
Dust off your treasure maps and nylon jackets for this year’s Goonies Day celebration, when fans of the Astoria-set 1985 movie flock to the coast to check out shooting locations like the old Clatsop County Jail at the Oregon Film MuseumHaystack RockEcola State Parkthe Lower Columbia Bowland the Flavel House Museum. While the official Goonies Day is June 7 (the 37th anniversary of the film’s release), the Astoria-based celebration runs June 3–8 and includes a costume contest and movie screening, an ’80s dance party, and a photo op in the “Goonies Jeep.” At the Oregon Film Museum or Astoria-Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce, visitors can snag a copy of the 37th Anniversary “Become an OrGOONian” booklet—complete at least 15 of the 37 activities and come back for a commemorative button. —Michelle Harris

Sarah McLachlan

June 10, Bend & June 12, Jacksonville 
So she cameoed on Portlandia, but now she’s skipping Portland on this tour? Building a mystery, we guess, or maybe she’s afraid of the path of thorns. Instead, she’s drawn to the rhythm at Bend’s Hayden Homes Amphitheater on June 10 (where she’ll perform with the Indigo Girls, who are coming to Portland this month), hopscotches us for a Gorge Amphitheater gig June 11 with Brandi Carlile, and then sweet-surrenders to Jacksonville’s Britt Pavilion June 12. Why no love, Sarah? Are we not good enough? Have you written us off as an Aimee Mann town? We will remember this. —MS

Cannon Beach Sandcastle Contest

June 10–12, Cannon Beach 
This 58th annual coast event also includes a bonfire the night before and a fun run the day after, but the main activity is Saturday, June 11, when groups in divisions from young “sand fleas” to masters will start building at 2 p.m., with the judging commencing at 7. Natural materials found on the beach only, the rules state, and “no artificial coloring, paint, flour, sugar, starch, adhesives, or cement.” —MS

Oregon Bach Festival

June 17–July 5, Eugene 
Since the 1970s this event has grown to be one of the largest celebrations in the US of the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach. Opening night features violinist, conductor, and longtime Portland Baroque Orchestra artistic director Monica Huggett, and the coming weeks bring lectures, choral groups, quartets, and more. —MS

Astoria Scandinavian Midsummer Festival

June 17–19, Astoria
While the Northwest is home to many descendants of Scandinavian immigrants, festival organizers stress that anyone can discover their “inner Viking” at the Clatsop County Fairgrounds, which will host a beer garden, an Icelandic horse area, armor-making demonstrations, a midsummer pole raising and dance, an æbleskiver eating contest, and the coronation of Miss Scandinavia 2022. —MS

Wine Country Pride

June 25, McMinnville 
Yamhill County is having its first-ever Pride street fair, and plans include a drag queen story hour at 1 p.m., a pet parade at 2, and a round of “speed friending” at 3:30, plus a dance party and a local talent show. All month long, restaurants, wineries, stores, and even an auto repair shop are participating in Wine Country Pride’s Rainbow Quest, offering a special item for sale as a fundraiser for the event and other community initiatives. —MS